History of the Internet in Guatemala

Technology has advanced rapidly, and a clear example of this is the country’s digital transformation. Although Internet penetration in Guatemala remains relatively low, with only 30% of the population having access to this resource, much has changed since the first connection to the Internet. In commemoration of International Internet Day, we want to share with you some key moments in the history of how Guatemala connected with the world.

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How to protect our privacy in social networks?

By definition, a social network is an Internet application that allows you to create content and share it with other users. It’s  this community aspect that makes them so popular, but it is also what can put our privacy at risk. It is important to note that maintaining security and privacy on social networks is essential. It is a way to protect our computers, but also to prevent our personal information from being leaked online.

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A Software Tool for the Study of Epilepsy

Epilepsy, sometimes known as seizure disorder, is a brain disorder that affects individuals of all ages. Although it can be seen as a rare disease, there are an estimated 50 million people affected by epilepsy worldwide. In developing countries, such as Guatemala, the diagnosis and treatment of this disease is difficult, due to cultural and socioeconomic factors. Furthermore, the study of epilepsy is limited to a small percentage of neurologists.

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Copies of Internet root servers will be installed in Guatemala

Guatemala was selected at the end of 2020 by + RAÍCES Program, of LACNIC (Latin America and the Caribbean Internet Address Registry), to install a copy of one of the thirteen Internet Domain name root servers.  A root server is a fundamental part of the Internet infrastructure that makes it easy to use, acting as the backbone of online access. Keep reading and find out more about the process and benefits of this decision! 

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